KILNS AND BIOCHAR PRODUCTION

KILN TECH INFORMATION

 

SuperChar 500

Burn time – around 8 hours
Moisture content – up to 60%
Feedstock size – rice husk and wood shavings up 30cm length logs
Feedstock type – most types of biomass
Feedstock volume – two x 6m3
Fuel source – dry woodchip and wood pellets
Char yield – up to 800kg per burn (400 per 6m3 chamber)
Infrastructure used – 4 electric fans and a generator (provided with the kiln)

The SuperChar 500 is a versatile commercial kiln that is capable of both drying and charring a wide range of feedstocks. The kiln is built in to a 20ft container for the ease of transport. The kiln consists of two kiln bodies and an external combustor, there is 6m3 capacity for feedstock in each kiln body. The kiln can run in three ways:
1. Drying – Both kiln bodies are filled with wet feedstock which is air dried using wood chip in the combustor.
2. Charring 1 – One kiln body is filled with dry material, such as reed bundles, to be charred. Gas produced during the pyrolysis is used to fuel the combustor and the excess heat is used to dry the material in the other kiln body.
3. Charring 2 – Kilns are alternatively filled with wet material which is initially dried using the excess heat from the other kiln body and is then charred and provides heat for the drying of the refilled other kiln body.

The kiln can process a wide range of feedstocks including woodshavings, woodchip, logs, rice husks, coffee husks, rush and wetland reed. The kiln can process feedstocks up to 60% moisture. The kiln requires dried woodchip to run as the fuel source for the initiation of the process, this is fed automatically into the combustor until the charring material is up to temperature and releasing sufficient syngas.

The burn time varies significantly, the length depends on the moisture content, type and size of the feedstock used. The length of a burn depends which function you are running under as well as the feedstock type, size and moisture content.

The SuperChar 500 kiln is a versatile kiln which can be used for many functions. Carbon Gold can customise the 500 kilns to suit customers’ needs. There are lots of agricultural processes where products need to be dried whilst leaving a low grade biomass in the waste stream. Through using a kiln that can process the waste low grade biomass to biochar whilst utilising the waste heat from pyrolysis, processing plants have the ability to have a sustainable waste management system whilst have low cost energy for drying functions.

SuperChar 500
Patent pending, all rights reserved.


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SuperChar 100 Mk II

Burn time – around 8 hours
Moisture content – up to 60%
Feedstock size –  wood shavings or rice husk, up to 30cm length logs
Feedstock type – most types of biomass
Feedstock volume – 1.5m3
Fuel source – logs, up to 15cm in length and 8cm in diameter
Char yield – up to 100kg per burn
Infrastructure used – 3 electric fans and a generator (provided with the kiln)

The SuperChar 100 Mk II is a small scale biochar kiln capable of processing a wide range of different materials. The kiln has a kiln body which is 4ft high and 5ft in diameter. The kiln body has an internal combustor; this leaves a feedstock capacity of 1.5m3. The kiln has been tested on a wide range of feedstocks including woodshavings, woodchip, logs, rice husks, coffee husks, rush and wetland reed. The kiln can process feedstocks up to 60% moisture.

The length of a burn time varies significantly and depends on the moisture content, type and size of the feedstock used. Some burns have been as quick as 3 hours whilst some have taken as long as 10 hours. After a burn the kiln needs to be left over night to cool prior to unloading. The kiln is loaded from the top and comes with an electric winch to remove the lid for loading. Once the kiln has been left to cool overnight after a burn it can be unloaded through a door at the bottom. A single burn can produce up to 100kg of biochar.

The kiln runs with a two stage cycle. The first stage is the drying of the feedstock whilst the second is the charring of the feedstock. The kiln acts as a steam drier during the first stage. The kiln has 3 electric fans which force the steam through the feedstock. A key factor as to whether a feedstock is suitable for use in the kiln is the porosity of the material. The fans must be able to force the steam to flow through the material. During the drying stage small logs are used as the fuel source to dry the feedstock.

The second stage of the burn is the charring of the feedstock. The temperatures of the feedstock is raised to around 450°C. The feedstock releases syngas during the pyrolysis process – this syngas is then burnt in the kiln to maintain suitable charring temperatures.

The kiln is transportable on a trailer (although a fork lift is needed to lift the kiln). The kiln therefore does not need planning permission as it is a transportable unit. It does produce some steam and smoke and so it is advisable to locate it away from buildings and people. The kiln does need electricity to run however it is supplied with a suitable generator.


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SuperChar 100 Mk I

Burn time – around 8 hours
Moisture content – up to 40%
Feedstock size – logs, up to 20cm in length and 10cm in diameter
Feedstock type – Wood
Feedstock volume – 1.5m3
Fuel source – logs, up to 15cm in length and 5cm in diameter
Char yield – up to 100kg per burn
Infrastructure used – handheld leaf blower (provided with the kiln)

The SuperChar 100 Mk I is a simple, easy to use kiln. It has a cylindrical kiln body which is 4ft high and 5ft in diameter. The kiln body has an internal combustor which hangs from the lid; this leaves space for 1.5m3 of feedstock. It takes approximately 8 hours for a single burn, this does depend on the moisture content, type and size of the feedstock used.

After a burn the kiln needs to be left over night to cool prior to unloading. The kiln is loaded from the top, the kiln comes with a hand driven winch to remove the lid for loading. After a burn the kiln is left overnight prior to unloading through a door at the bottom. A single burn can produce up to 100kg of biochar.

The kiln runs with a two stage cycle, the first stage is the drying of the feedstock whilst the second is the charring of the feedstock. The kiln acts as a steam drier during the first stage, the kiln relies on natural convection currents throughout the burn cycle. During the drying stage small logs are used as the fuel source to dry the feedstock. The second stage of the burn is the pyrolysis of the feedstock, the temperatures are raised to around 450°C, the feedstock releases syngas. This syngas is then burnt in the kiln to maintain suitable charring temperatures.

The kiln is transportable on a small trailer (although a fork lift is needed to lift the kiln). The kiln therefore does not need planning permission as it is a transportable unit. It does produce some steam and smoke and so it is advisable to locate it away from buildings and people. The kiln does not need electricity to run, it comes with a leaf blower which is used to supply air to the internal combustor.

The SuperChar 100 Mk II kiln is a more sophisticated version of the 100 Mk I, the kiln is capable of processing are far wider range of feedstocks. The Mk I and the Mk II produce the same volume of biochar per burn, the Mk I kiln relies on the natural convection of heat within the kiln to evenly char the feedstock whilst the Mk II has a forced circulation. It is due to this forced circulation that the Mk II is capable of charring such a wide range of feedstocks at such high moisture contents.

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